Cigdem V. Sirin, José D. Villalobos and Nicholas A. Valentino receive APSA Best Book Award –

This APSA Best Book Award Awarded annually by the American Political Science Association (APSA) for the best books on government, politics, or international affairs. This year, we shared the ASPA Best Book Award: The Work of Cigdem V. Sirin, Nicholas A. Valentino, and Jose D. Villalobos Seeing Us in Them: The Politics of Social Divide and Group Empathy; and the work of Diana C. Mutz, Winners and losers: The psychology of foreign trade.

Cigdem v. Cillingco-author of Seeing Us in Them: The Politics of Social Divide and Group Empathy, is a professor of political science at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP). She received her PhD from Texas A&M University in 2009 and her BA from Bogazici University in Istanbul, Turkey in 2003. Dr. Sirin is the recipient of the University of Texas System Board of Regents Outstanding Teaching Award and a founding member of the UTEP Academy. famous teacher. Dr. Sirin’s main areas of interest are international relations and political psychology. Her research center is the micro-foundation for studying the processes and outcomes of interstate and intrastate conflicts.Her publications include articles Journal of Political Science, Political Psychology, Quarterly Journal of International Studies, international political science reviewand many other venues. Her book with Nicholas Valentino and José Villalobos is titled Seeing Us in Them: The Politics of Social Divide and Group Empathy (Cambridge University Press, 2021) Winner of the 2022 APSA Best Book Award, the 2022 APSA Best Experimental Research Book, the 2022 APSA Best Political Psychology Book, and the 2022 ISPP David O. Sears Best Book Award for Popular Politics . Dr. Sirin served as UTEP’s Center for Faculty Leadership and Development (CFLD) Director from 2020 to 2022 and coordinated UTEP’s Support Program for Online Learning (Sol) during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Jose D. Villalobosco-author of Seeing Us in Them: The Politics of Social Divide and Group Empathy, is Professor of Political Science and Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP). He received his Bachelor of Arts from the University of Texas at San Antonio and his Ph.D. from Texas A&M University. He is the recipient of the University of Texas System Board of Regents Distinguished Teaching Award, the UTEP Most Distinguished Faculty Award, and the Liberal Arts University Distinguished Service Award. Dr. Villalobos most recently served as the Dean’s Fellow and Chair of the UTEP Liberal Arts Community Engagement and Leadership (CEL) program. His research examines institutional leadership/management, public opinion dynamics, and policy making in the United States in areas such as the U.S. presidency, race/ethnic politics and identity, and immigration policy.His publications include articles political magazine, political psychology, Political Research Quarterly, Presidential Research Quarterlyand American behavioral scientist. Dr. Villalobos is also a co-author (with Justin Vaughn) The White House Czar: The Rise of the Policy Czar as a Presidential Management Tool (University of Michigan Press, 2015) and co-authors (with Cigdem Sirin and Nicholas Valentino) Seeing Us in Them: The Politics of Social Divide and Group Empathy (Cambridge University Press, 2021).

Quote from the Awards Committee:

exist Seeing Us in Them: The Politics of Social Divide and Group Empathy, Sirin, Valentino, and Villalobos investigate an important topic – attitudes toward people outside of one’s immediate identity group. The authors develop an original theory of the sources and consequences of outgroup empathy, which argues that people who have experienced discrimination and other forms of unfair treatment are more likely to care about the well-being of other marginalized groups. Through a series of empirical tests, the authors show that group empathy is a key predictor of attitudes toward immigrants and refugees, support for Black Lives Matter, perceptions of the #MeToo movement, and more. Sirin et al.’s theory of empathy, and its new measure, has potentially broad applications in providing tools for analyzing identity disagreements in many parts of the world. Moreover, at a time when polarization in U.S. politics is further alienating people, see us in them Bringing attention to a fundamental human quality — empathy — can help us reunite.

APSA thanks committee members for their service: Kimberly J. Morgan (Chair), George Washington University, Professor Eva Anduiza, Autonomous University of Barcelona, ​​Dr. Karam Dana, University of Washington, Dr. Hans JG Hassell, Florida State University, and Nils, University of Wisconsin-Madison Dr. Ringe.

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