What advice the staff at Out West Books has for your next great read

Every week as part of SunLit, the literary section of The Sun, we offer employee testimonials from Colorado bookstores. This week, the staff at Out West Books in Grand Junction featured The Art of Rock, Soul of the Stone, and The Lost World of Old Times.


Rock Art: Visions of a Disappearing Cultural Landscape

Jonathan Bailey
Johnson Books
$27.95
November 2019

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from the publisher: A call for conservation through 200 beautiful photographs by Jonathan Bailey and 19 articles written by renowned archaeologists, anthropologists, artists and members of the Aboriginal Tribal Council. It highlights the many threats these sacred sites face and provides valuable insights into how we can responsibly protect this land.

Marya from Out West Books: I have a degree in archaeology, which I don’t often use as a bookseller – unless it comes to curated books like Jonathan Bailey’s “Art of Rock”. yeah! I use my degree! This is more than just a coffee table photography book. Yes, Jonathan’s photography is stunning, including many lesser-known petroglyphs and hieroglyphic panels, but it’s the prose of authors like RE Burrillo, Greg Child, and Lewisburg professor Andrew Gulliford that make this book the one you need to read slowly and digestion book.

Aside from emphasizing conservation, which seems like a no-brainer to most of us, the essayists in “Rock Art” make it clear how invaluable these sites are to science and history, and to each of us How important it is to know and protect them.


soul of stone

Gary and Ming Adams
Ancients Canyon Visitor Ranch
$45
2017

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from the publisher: This book is a tribute to ancient artists and their stone creations. These magical images continue to enchant and inspire us with their power and beauty. We hope this book will raise awareness of the unique treasures left by ancient peoples and help us understand the importance of preserving their heritage.

Marya from Out West Books: This is a coffee table book. Filled with gorgeous photographs of hieroglyphs, petroglyphs, ruins, and canyons from southwestern Colorado and eastern Utah, the book itself is a call for conservation. Gary and Ming Adams own the ancient Canyon Visitor Ranch in McElmore Canyon near Cortez, which strategically places them at the center of the ancient art of the Colorado Plateau. Their love of the area and its ancient wonders shines through the visual gallery of this beautiful place worthy of preservation.


The Lost World of Old Times: Discoveries in the Ancient Southwest

David Roberts
WW Norton
$17.95
April 2016

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from the publisher: In this exciting story of intellectuals and archaeological finds, David Roberts recounts his long quest over the past 20 years to find spectacular prehistoric sites and panels of rock art known to very few modern travelers. His adventures span Utah, Arizona, New Mexico and southwestern Colorado, revealing the mysteries of the ancestral Pueblo people and their contemporary neighbors Mogolon and Fremont, and more recently Navajo and Comanche .

Marya from Out West Books: David Roberts’ Lost Old World and its companion book, Finding Old Things: Exploring the World of Anasazi in the Southwest, are the store’s most popular books. In “The Lost World,” David explores a newer scientific approach, emphasizing that archaeology is not about “things,” i.e., artifacts found in excavations, because the archeology of things is the archeology of the lost. It does seem that once something is “discovered” it disappears or is destroyed. The desecration of tombs in Egypt is a good example. A personal example: While hiking in what is now Bear Ears in the early 1980s, I could barely walk without stepping on pot debris. Fragments are few and far between now.

In part, the book is about David accompanying archaeologists at the Utah Museum of Natural History to investigate Range Creek shortly after rancher Waldo Wilcox handed them a canyon barely touched by modern humans. . Nor is it just relics and ruins. Roberts spent time with Colorado State University professor Stephen Lekson and his theory of the Chaco Meridian. I love this book, full of extraordinary characters and thought-provoking premise. Digging artifacts? Leave that arrow in place? How did that blanket end up in the Telluride Museum?

This week’s book list comes from:

western book

533 Main St., Grand Junction

outwestbooks.co

as part of the Colorado Sun Literary Section – SunLit – We offer staff picks from bookstores across the state. read more.

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